10 Must See Places In Southeast Asia

Southeast Asian Persuasian

Places that make you feel alive. Places that make you say damn! Places that make your jaw drop!

1. Bangkok

Bangkok is the Crux of Southeast Asia. Khao San, Sukhumvit, Silom, Siam, Chinatown...It's all here. if you want to go shopping checkout Siam,  if you want to go party and experience The Nightlife go dancing check out silom.  if you'd like to see the upscale area go to Sukhumvit.

Where to Stay

Sure you can look online for a nice place to stay for about 35 u.S. Per night, but you don't need to since there are so many hostels in the city that you can stay at for just a few bucks a night.

Soi 4 in Silom is the gayborhood. Don't miss it!
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Mike
Recommendation

Bangkok is the Crux of Southeast Asia. Khao San, Sukhumvit, Silom, Siam, Chinatown...It's all here. if you want to go shopping checkout Siam,  if you want to go party and experience The Nightlife go dancing check out silom.  if you'd like to see the upscale area go to Sukhumvit.

Where to Stay

Sure you can look online for a nice place to stay for about 35 u.S. Per night, but you don't need to since there are so many hostels in the city that you can stay at for just a few bucks a night.

Activities

Do you like to drink and party? Then Khao San is your spot. Starting in the early afternoon tourists Backpackers start drinking and eating food from the street vendors and shopping, and then on Into the Night dance music starts playing people start dancing in the street and in the bars and before you know it you're eating a scorpion on a stick.

Now if you like to go out drinking and dancing in the gayborhood then silom is your spot. DJ station is the big dance club in the area and it has a cover charge of about 10 US dollars but it comes with two drinks.  there's plenty of tourists here as well as locals. This is one of our favorite spots in Bangkok to party. There's a stop on the BTS for this area.

If you're not looking for the gay scene but you're looking for ladies or maybe some ladyboys then you should check out Nana. There's plenty of sports bars dancing bars Go-Go bars strip clubs, food stalls, hotels and hostels and the BTS and MTS are nearby.

Watch Out

There are plenty of tousist scams in Bangkok. Check online, maybe YouTube, for a quick overview. This could save you quite a bit of money!

2. Chiang Mai

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Internet Geek? Stop in at Maya and check out CAMP - a digital playground
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Mike
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3. Kuala Lumpur

Kuala Lumpur is a walkable City, sure there's places you can take the train, but I enjoy walking to see the locals. The Petronas Towers, the Kuala Lumpur tower, the Batu Caves, Petaling Street, the Kuala Lumpur City Center.

You can take the train straight out to the batch of caves, it'll be the last stop. It's pretty cheap to get out there I think it's like $2. There's quite a few Hindu holidays so don't be surprised if you arrive and you see a lot of people. After hiking the stairs you'll enter the cave area and you'll be able to see the monkeys I like to eat food from The Tourist. On your way back down y'all had a great view of the city and a nice shot with your camera.

The Batu Caves are great, and there's a restaurant that serves incredible food near downtown
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Mike
Recommendation

Petaling Street is a large street market. it's rather unbelievable how much merchandise that can fit into this area and on the streets. You'll have people following you from sawdust all trying to sell you wallets watches jewelry. Anything you can think of you can probably find here.

4. Hong Kong

Hong Kong is like a travel Adventure City. There's so much to see and do in this city you could probably spend a week here and not do it all. Of course there's Disneyland, but there's plenty of natural beauty and cityscape to see as well. If you get a chance you should take the cable car the aerial cable car non-paying 360 you'll get gorgeous views of the city.

Hong Kong will steal your heart
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Mike
Recommendation

We took a small Cable Car ground cable car up to Victoria Peak so we can oversee the city, if you're lucky it won't be foggy and like it was when we went. But if it is there's a photographer up there who will Photoshop the city lights in the background for you for a fee. We opted for the all-natural photo selfie that we have here on the page. This is such a common occurrence that they actually have somebody that can Photoshop the background for you.

At the top of Victoria Peak you can check out Madame Tussauds if you want to see the wax museum, it's pretty cool. Make sure that when you get the Peak Tram up to Victoria Peak you get a round trip ticket.

And since you're so close you might as well take the ferry across to Macau.  I would suggest doing this in the morning to explore Macau during the day and then take the ferry back into Hong Kong in the evening so you get to see the city lights across the bay at night time.

There's also the Tian Tan Giant Buddha on a mountain, but we didn't get to see it since we only had two days there.

5. Macau

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Make your belly happy! Try the street food
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6. Khao Laem

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Travel slow and take in the nature that surrounds you
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7. Kho Rong Island

Make your belly happy! Try the street food
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8. Bai Tho Mountain

Make your belly happy! Try the street food
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9. Khao Yai National Park

Khao yai National Park in Thailand cost 400 Baht to enter, and it cost about another four hundred Baht for a tent, a sleeping bag, and pillow. If you don't know how to pitch a tent, bring some beer and meet your neighbors!!!:-) It's totally worth it!

Here you'll find elephants if you're lucky, as well as waterfalls, hiking trails, deer, gibbons, giant lizards, incredible scenic views and of course ticks and leeches.;-) Dress in long pants and high socks.

Hike the waterfalls and go to the elephant towers
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If you're an outdoors or nature person this is not to be missed. You could ride motorbikes up, but it'd be much better to rent a car or go with local Thai people and take their car.

The deer will come right into the campground and eating apple out of your hand. our neighbors left their tent unzip and when we came back from a hiking trail without a deer and their tent poking its head out staying dry from the rain. So of course we filmed it and showed it to them when they returned. They were pretty surprised!

10. Sangkhlaburi, Thailand

Wow! This part of Thailand is incredible!

Do whatever it takes to come here. It's about a 5 hour drive west of Bangkok by car, so by motorbike it might be a little bit longer. Spend a weekend here with a friend and go see the Mon bridge and go walk around the neighborhood on the other side. Walk up to the temples, eat the local cuisine, buy some trinkets from the people. make sure you take a long boat ride out to the sunken temples.

Walk across the Mon bridge and get your face painted.
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Mike
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When we went, the river was low so the temples were above water. We were able to walk right into them. But during other months of the year, the river rises like 15 to 20...maybe even 30 feet, so it's actually partially sunken temples that you float around on a boat.

The Myanmar border is right here as well. If you have room in your passport, check it out. But remember that you'll only have a 15 day period to either extend your visa or leave Thailand once you cross back into Thailand.

There are waterfalls and national parks all over this area. Keep your eyes open on your drive back into Bangkok and you'll see a Buddhist temple inside a cave right along the main road.

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Sangkhla Buri Trip

Nash and I went on a weekend trip to Sangkhla Buri in the Kanchanaburi Province of Thailand.

map-sangkhlaburi-tripThe video says it all. We had a fucking good time. My best weekend in Thailand, so far!

I highly suggest the trip with a buddy if you get the chance…here’s how we did it.

We didn’t have any expectations. This is key if you want a chill and surprising weekend. You’ll end up doing things that you wouldn’t expect and wouldn’t be possible to plan ahead of time.

Take a buddy. Take 2 buddies max. This trip is better as a duo, since flexibility is where the spontaneity and magic of chance occurs best.

We left Friday night from Chachoengsao. The drive in Nash’s car took us about 7.5 hours including stops for gas and food. We arrived at the Mon bridge about 30 minutes before sunrise, we were tired, but it was well worth the effort to see the mist in the mountain tops and the sunrise. The Mon bridge is a walking bridge, so the one for cars is where you get the great viewpoint from. There were photographers set up to photograph the bridge with the sunrise behind it, and there were about 20 other tourists watching as well. It was magical being there in the wee morning while it was still twilight.

 

After the sun was up, we drove back across the bridge – it was time to eat. We found a town market selling food. There is a Sevy and a Family Mart there as well. The market had standard Thai food and Burmese food, since it was so close to the border. There’s a guy who makes fried bread – like a doughnut or beignet.

We wanted to eat on the bridge, so we took our food to go. We drove over to the start of the bridge. There’s decent parking for a car or bikes on the street connecting to the bridge. It’s a residential street. On this same road, we found a cabin to rent for a few hours of rest. We weren’t able to convince the lady of a discount, but we really needed sleep, so we didn’t mind.

The cabins overlook a ravine and part of the bridge. It’s definitely a beautiful place to stay. Here’s the location.

Later in the day, after a long nap, we checked out and went for lunch. We crossed the Mon bridge by foot and found a restaurant just on the other side. We saw a temple from the bridge and decided to walk up that way to find it. On the way, a kid told us to hop on the back of his bike and he would ride us up to the temple. Sweet! (this wouldn’t work with 3 people – this is duo-magic! )

The temples were nice, and the walk was nice. On our way back it started to rain a little, so we took shelter under an awning. We were stuck there for about 20 minutes, but we made the most of it by checking out the pictures and videos we had already taken. It was fun.

While we were waiting, a mother and daughter walked past us. The daughter must’ve been around 7 years old. They smiled and waved, and so did we. Then they ducked into a house across the way. The daughter brought us a spare umbrella for us to share and keep! Wha!?!? More DUO-MAGIC!

So we’re completely reeling in the feels and adventure of this trip already.

While we were chillin’ on the bridge, we watched people walk past us and we watched them sneak photos of us. 😉

We got our faces painted by the girls with the gold stamps and matching selfies. Of course.

We drove up to the Myanmar border, it was about a 15 minute drive. The car tire needed air, and it took us a few places to find it, but eventually we got some air. This added some flavor to the trip.

The bordertown was cool. We didn’t have enough time to go across, and Nash didn’t have room for a stamp in passport, but we drove up and down the street which had a wall separating the two countries. There’s holes in the wall/fence that people walk though. It’s a town, but part of it is in a different country….that doesn’t stop these people from their daily life.

We walked around the small village a bit, we checked out the market, and then we thought we might have enough time to hike a waterfall, so we checked out the closest one and drove over to it. The drive ended up taking longer than we though and the road was curvy with blind spots.

When we got to the waterfall parking area, we could see that this place hadn’t been maintained for at least 2 or 3 years. There were no park rangers, signs were broken, and the trail was overgrown. I happened to hear flowing water, and that was the only reason we found the trail head. After a few minutes on the trail though, we realized that it was too dark and too overgrown to be safe for passage. There was fresh elephant dung and getting mauled wasn’t on our list of ‘duo-magic’ things to do, so we retreated back to the car, and drove back to the Mon bridge town to find a place to sleep.

There was a night market to check out, and a beer store with a large variety of imports and liquors. We found a room at a Thai restaurant / hotel. The place was on the corner of the street and it was big. The room was decent, so we had a few beers, a few shots and passed out.

The next day – Sunday – first thing we did was grab a long-boat over to the ‘sunken’ temples. They weren’t underwater while we were there, but they were worth the trip. I think it was 300-500 Baht each? Not really sure…but we just walked down to the water front and asked a guy to take us there instead of buying tickets from the sales booths up on the bridge.

We knew that we wanted to hike some waterfalls before driving back to Chachoengsao. We found a couple places dotting the map on the drive, so we stopped at the next closest one – Kra Teng Jeng Waterfall. It was a win! And there was no entrance fee.

We were the only people there. The trail hadn’t been maintained for a couple years, or even hiked by the park rangers. The trail was overgrown at parts, so we just kinda pushed through until we found the trail again. It ended up being easier to hike in-the-falls about midway through, because the trail on the sides was overgrown. It was epic. We shot great footage of the water and got some great pictures. We felt like explorers, since we had to make the trail as we went along.

Some of the sign posts were ingrown by trees, and some were lying on the ground. There were parts where the hike required us to climb a wooden makeshift ladder on the side of the creek. It felt like boy scouts all over again!

I think we got 1 or 2 checkpoints from the top of the trail. We didn’t go all the way, because the trail was too overgrown.

On the way back, we checked out the “Big Tree” that a sign pointed to. It was definitely worth the short hike. It’s massive!

We jumped into the car and headed down to the park entrance to shower off and put on dry clothes.

On the drive back, we found some more waterfalls, small but beautiful and plentiful, just off the side of the road. We hadn’t seen them on the drive up, because it was night. These falls were popular. There were many locals and 1 or 2 tourists checking them out. Some of the Thai kids were swimming in them.

There was also a cave in the side of the mountain on the way back that we hadn’t seen before. It was inhabited by monks. So we stopped to say hello and take some pictures. The were kind and we left a donation.

As we got closer to Bangkok, we saw a large, abandoned airplane, either a Boeing 747 or and Airbus. It was MASSIVE, and it was gutted. It was parked in a field -on display. Nash though we would be able to sneak over the fence to check it out, but when we figured out that we couldn’t get to the fence because of a moat, we decided to just ask the guard if we could check it out. “Yep!”

So we climbed up this scaffolding into the plane. Holy shit was this cool! We stood on the wing of one of the biggest planes in the world! We sat in the cockpit, and in the first class seats. This was an awesome segway on the tail end of our trip.

We got back to Chach with enough time to get a good night’s rest for school the next day.

Rating: 11/10

Turn on your sound and play this full screen 🙂

The best backpack for travelling around the world hasslefree

We’ve been backpacking the world for 7 months now and this is what we’ve learned.
First, here’s the bag we recommend you buy:Osprey Porter Travel Backpack Bag, Black, 46-Liter
  • Wheels break.
  • Hard suitcases don’t fit and cannot be squished to fit.
  • You shouldn’t carry enough stuff to have to need wheels.
  • If one bag costs $30 dollars more and is a little better, spend the money.
  • Make sure it fits comfortably-try it on in the store.
  • 47 liters is enough space to keep enough clothes and anything else you need to travel the world.
  • I’m glad I didn’t get anything bigger, because I’d hate to have to carry anything else.
  • I over-packed as it is now with 47 liters.
 
If you are travelling for 10 days, take 3-4 days of clothes and do laundry. It’s easier than carrying 5 days of clothes.